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POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT

INCREASED QUALITY OF LIFE.

MEANINGFUL MODIFICATIONS.

Image by Kamila Maciejewska
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How can we help?

IT’S ABOUT IMPROVING PEOPLE'S QUALITY OF LIFE

Behaviour support is all about improving people's quality of life – something we are well placed to help with using our clinical lens as occupational therapists. Quality of life is quite a big topic, but essentially, we break it down to look at the activities which are meaningful in a person’s life and finding ways to make sure they can be completed by that person without overbearing restrictions in place, even with a disability.

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What to expect?

A SUPPORTIVE CYCLE OF REVIEW 

An ongoing process - positive behaviour support is really a cycle of review. We look at a challenge, explore options to reduce that challenge, trial these changes and then look at the outcomes achieved. Then we commence the cycle again [obviously *only* when it is needed, but you get the idea]. 

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Is PBS what we actually need?

ALWAYS A DIFFICULT ONE

If you work with or know somebody who displays behaviours of concern it won't be a surprise to you that successful interventions need to be made in a timely manner and delivered at a level that is manageable for them to be implemented successfully. We approach positive behaviour support [PBS] with through the lens that each person has their own individual story with different life events and experiences then that lead them to a given point in time. We understand this and combine our clinical skills in our approach. The only way you can really know whether we are the best match is to get in contact and explore our service further.

 
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Are you ready to make a referral?

We've got you covered. Here's our downloadable referral form which can be completed electronically. 

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How can we help?

IN LOTS OF WAYS, REALLY.

Behaviour support is all about improving people's quality of life – something we are well placed to help with using our clinical lens as occupational therapists. Quality of life is quite a big topic, but essentially, we break it down to look at the activities which are meaningful in a person’s life and finding ways to make sure they can be completed by that person without overbearing restrictions in place, even with a disability.

There are lots of reasons why a client might come to us needing positive behaviour intervention support [PBIS] as behaviours of concern typically relate to situational contexts. Something that we do to help is by working with participants [and their key supports] to identify different triggers and situations that may contribute to behaviours that are occurring which are of concern to those around them. There are clear guidelines around what makes something a ‘behaviour of concern’, however a summary of the essential points of this is below.

Broadly speaking, a behaviour of concern is when the severity of a behaviour presents a serious challenge in any of the following five areas:

  • Potential breakdown of placement weather at school/day programme/home etc.

  • Risk of harm towards the individual or others.

  • Where the persons development or occupational involvement is significantly impacted.

  • Where quality of life, goals or wellbeing are being impacted.

  • Where there is a risk of behaviour leading to the person needing to move to an alternative residence.

PBS enables a consistent and structured approach to support an individual in life's activities. This is done by strengthening positive behaviours through reinforcement and anticipating challenges through understanding the function of a behaviour.

Image by Rosie Sun
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What to expect?

OR WHAT NOT TO EXPECT, MORE IMPORTANTLY

An ongoing process - positive behaviour support is really a cycle of review. We look at a challenge, explore options to reduce that challenge, trial these changes and then look at the outcomes achieved. Then we commence the cycle again [obviously *only* when it is needed, but you get the idea]. 


There are lots of key components that contribute to the positive behaviour support process. Some of these include:

 

  • Completing a functional behaviour analysis.

  • Defining focus for behaviour support.

  • Data collection – reviewing situations, triggers, actions and results etc.

  • Developing both an interim and comprehensive behaviour support plan. The behaviour support plan becomes a vehicle to communicate an individual’s support needs. 

  • Supporting the implementation of strategies outlined in the plan.

These assessments are completed in collaboration with the participant and their key supports which can be family friends and paid support people who are involved in the person's day-to-day life. The main intentions behind positive behaviour support include improving a person's quality of life first and foremost and secondly to reduce any restrictive practises which are in place.